Prevention

What's going on in the mouth?

You probably know that a dental cavity is a hole in a tooth. But did you know that a cavity is the result of the tooth decay process that happens over time? Did you know that you can interrupt and even reverse this process to avoid a cavity?

Our mouths are full of bacteria. Hundreds of different types live on our teeth, gums, tongue and other places in our mouths. Some bacteria are helpful. But some can be harmful such as those that play a role in the tooth decay process.  Tooth decay is the result of an infection with certain types of bacteria that use sugars in food to make acids. Over time, these acids can make a cavity in the tooth.

Throughout the day, a tug of war takes place inside our mouths

On one team are dental plaque—a sticky, colorless film of bacteria—plus foods and drinks that contain sugar or starch (such as milk, bread, cookies, candy, soda, juice, and many others). Whenever we eat or drink something that contains sugar or starch, the bacteria use them to produce acids. These acids begin to eat away at the tooth's hard outer surface, or enamel.

On the other team are the minerals in our saliva (such as calcium and phosphate) plus fluoride from toothpaste, water, and other sources. This team helps enamel repair itself by replacing minerals lost during an "acid attack."

Our teeth go through this natural process of losing minerals and regaining minerals all day long.​

 

How does dental cavity develop?

When a tooth is exposed to acid frequently -- for example, if you eat or drink often, especially foods or drinks containing sugar and starches -- the repeated cycles of acid attacks cause the enamel to continue to lose minerals. A white spot may appear where minerals have been lost. This is a sign of early decay

Tooth decay can be stopped or reversed at this point. Enamel can repair itself by using minerals from saliva, and fluoride from toothpaste or other sources.

But if the tooth decay process continues, more minerals are lost. Over time, the enamel is weakened and destroyed, forming a cavity. A cavity is permanent damage that a dentist has to repair with a filling.

Fluoride

Fluoride is a mineral that can prevent tooth decay from progressing. It can even reverse, or stop, early tooth decay.

Fluoride works to protect teeth. It . . .

  • prevents mineral loss in tooth enamel and replaces lost minerals

  • reduces the ability of bacteria to make acid

You can get fluoride from

 

If the dentist thinks your child needs more fluoride, he or she may—

  • Apply a fluoride gel or varnish to tooth surfaces

  • Prescribe fluoride tablets

  • Recommend using a fluoride mouth rinse

 
 

Diet

 

Your child's diet is important in preventing a cavity. Remember . . . every time we eat or drink something that contains sugar or starches, bacteria in our mouth use the sugar and starch to produce acids. These acids begin to eat away at the tooth's enamel.

Our saliva can help fight off this acid attack. But if we eat frequently throughout the day -- especially foods and drinks containing sugar and starches -- the repeated acid attacks will win the tug of war, causing the tooth to lose minerals and eventually develop a cavity.

That's why it's important to keep an eye on how often your children eat as well as what they eat.

Tooth-friendly tips:

  • Limit between-meal snacks. This reduces the number of acid attacks on teeth and gives teeth a chance to repair themselves.

  • Save candy, cookies, soda, and other sugary drinks for special occasions

  • Limit fruit juice. Follow the Daily Juice Recommendations  from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  • Make sure your child doesn't eat or drink anything with sugar in it after bedtime tooth brushing. Saliva flow decreases during sleep. Without enough saliva, teeth are less able to repair themselves after an acid attack

 

Brushing and Flossing

Tooth-brushing is one of the easiest methods of cavity prevention. But which type of toothbrush should your child use?

Manual or powered, both can assist with keeping your child’s smile cavity-free. When choosing a manual toothbrush, look for round-ended (polished) bristles that clean while being gentle on the gums. Choose one specifically designed for children's smaller hands and mouths. Look for large handles that can help children control the toothbrush.  Be sure to brush your preschooler’s teeth and supervise the brushing and flossing of school-age children until they are 7 to 8 years of age.

 

Sealants

Dental sealants are another good way to help avoid a cavity. Sealants are thin, plastic coatings painted onto the chewing surfaces of the back teeth, or molars. Here's why sealants are helpful:

 

The chewing surfaces of back teeth are rough and uneven because they have small pits and grooves. Food and bacteria can get stuck in the pits and grooves and stay there a long time because toothbrush bristles can't easily brush them away. Sealants cover these surfaces and form a barrier that protects teeth and prevents food and bacteria from getting trapped there.

Since most cavities in children and adolescents develop in the molars (the back teeth), it's best to get these teeth sealed as soon as they come in:

  • The first permanent molars — called "6 year molars" — come in between the ages of 5 and 7.

  • The second permanent molars — "12 year molars" — come in when a child is between 11 and 14 years old.

 

Regular Dental Visit

Visit a dentist regularly for cleanings and an examination. During the visit the dentist or hygienist will:

  • Remove dental plaque

  • Check for any areas of early tooth decay

  • Show you and your child how to thoroughly clean the teeth

  • Apply a fluoride gel or varnish, if necessary

  • Schedule your next regular check-up

 

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Vancouver BC V6R 2G4

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Coquitlam BC V3J 3R3